Music Education

Passion Pulse Vol 1 Issue 3

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Hey Passion Family! Well, the rumors are true…summer is officially over! How do we know? Because Labor Day has come and gone, students are returning from Grandma’s house, and the back-to-school shelves are looking quite bare. But mostly we know because the stores are not so subtly serving up pumpkin egg nog! If the egg nog is out, then summer must definitely be over! So, time to gear up and get ready to “fall” in love with everything going on in September at Passion Academy.

West End Construction Complete

They say Rome wasn’t built in a day…but that was Rome. And, while our West End Remodeling Project wasn’t completed in a day, a LOT was accomplished in a very short amount of time. And now, just in time to enter the fall season, and right on schedule, we are happy to announce that Phase 3, the construction of our new dance studio in the former Band Development studio is complete! A big thank you to Daniel and Derek for all of your hard work, and a big thank you to all of you for your patience during the transition. Passion Academy has been through quite an impressive transformation.


Passion Arts Foundation Annual Benefit Concert a Huge Success


A huge thank you to all who participated in our first annual Passion Arts Foundation Benefit Concert! The event was a great success in so many ways. Our partnership with Nightingale Ice Cream Sandwiches was a hit, selling out all the goods, there was a tremendous turnout estimated around 100 people, and in true Passion Academy form the performances were top notch. There is even word on the street that a new hit group called “Daniel and Son” performed. But the best part about the event was being able to raise money for what is probably the most meaningful part of Passion Academy, our Passion Arts Foundation.


We are happy to report that Virginia Ventura, a very deserving student who we highlighted in last month’s Pulse, was able to benefit directly from the Foundation, and from the concert. Virginia received a fully refurbished violin and began violin lesson two weeks ago! What an opportunity for her and for us. Once again, a big thank you to all of you who came out to make this possible. Please continue to support and champion our Passion Arts Foundation. We truly believe that the work we are trying to do through it speaks volumes about who we are at Passion and who we want to be.


The Art of Worship

Did you know that Passion Academy has a Worship Leader Development program? It’s called The Art of Worship and we hope you’ll take a minute to check it out.

The program was developed by our worship leader mentor Randall Goulard out of something that has been a huge part of the core vision of Passion Academy since the beginning: a desire to serve churches by helping them grow and thrive in the areas of worship and the creative arts. The Art of Worship includes not only individual one-on-one worship leader mentoring, but also sound engineering consultation for churches and overall worship program consultation. The sky really is the limit in terms of how we want to help churches and their worship programs be everything God intends for them to me. So if you know of churches, worship leaders, pastors, or if you are connected to anyone that might be interested in letting us help them, please let us know or direct them to our website. Help us get the word out!

The Music Parents’ Guide by Anthony Mazzochi

Did you know that students who take a break from playing and practicing over the summer is a major reason why they don’t continue with their instruments? You didn’t? Well, now that we have half of you feeling guilty, let us reassure you that’s not the only reason students stop playing or get discouraged. Anthony Mazzochi lays out a number of reasons why it can be difficult for you or your student to stick with an instrument long enough to see real results. Here are some other common factors:

  • Parents don’t see music as a core subject. Music has to be made a priority in order to see success. We don’t usually think about quitting English or Math, because it’s seen as too important. Parents who see music the same way, as a core subject will see their students quit less often.
  • Students don’t know how to get better. Without the proper tools and practice habits to get better at anything, students will become frustrated and want to quit. When parents are invested in learning enough about music to help their child succeed they can help support them at home.
  • Parents and students think they aren’t musically talented. Natural musical talent is often misunderstood. As long as students know how to practice and do so regularly, they WILL get better.
  • The instrument is in disrepair. Students, parents and teachers need to be aware of the basics of instrument maintenance and be on top of repairs when needed so that the student isn’t mistaking a broken valve or reed for a wrong note.
  • Other activities are pulling the child. Life is all about priorities right. Especially as fall begins to ramp up, it is really important for parents and students both to be thinking about what they want to be involved in, and what they should be involved in. The old adage, “jack of all trades, master of none” is only too true when it comes to extracurricular activities. Also remember that the “quality of your “yes” is defined by the quantity of your “no’s”.
Lastly, voting is now open for Family Favorites presented by Style Weekly! It would mean so much to us if you would take a moment to vote for Passion Academy in the Activities categories: Favorite Music Lessons, Dance Lessons and Performing Arts Lessons. Thank you for your support!

VOTE HERE

10 Reasons to Thank Your Music Teacher

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Many people making a living from music, or even those who carry it on as a hobby, will be able to remember being heavily influenced or inspired by a music teacher. Whether it was at school or as a private tutor, they are often responsible for that initial bit of encouragement that makes young people realize that music can be much more than something to be enjoyed in your spare time.

Even if it doesn’t ultimately result in a professional career, engagement with music is increasingly being recognized as a great benefit for us all in many ways. This has produced a growing number of efforts to draw attention to the importance of music education in schools and in the community.

Music Monday is an annual event held in Canada on the first Monday of May. Organized by the Coalition for Music Education since 2005, it brings together school children and their teachers, community groups, music ensembles and work colleagues to highlight the benefits of a musical education. The day involves a mass concert where groups across the country come together at the same time to play a song which has been chosen as the anthem for the year.

Another major part of the day is to highlight the hard work put in by music teachers. A couple of years ago, CBC asked several leading musicians to write letters of thanks to their most influential music teacher to recognize the role they had played in their life and education. The letters described teachers who had run numerous bands and musical ensembles at high schools, organized trips to competitions in other cities, and inspired the creativity of their pupils.

In one of the letters, jazz pianist Oliver Jones writes about the huge impact his piano lessons with Daisy Peterson-Sweeney, the sister of famous jazz pianist Oscar Peterson, had on him: “All of my musical life I have considered myself to be very fortunate to have been surrounded by wonderful and talented people, those who have guided me, inspired me, and most of all those who have motivated me as a youngster. It is rare to find all of these qualities in one person.”

Even for those of us who don’t quite manage to make a professional career out of musical performing, there are no shortage of things that we can take from our school music lessons and the teachers who delivered them. Here are ten things music teachers should be thanked for.

1. They taught you that it’s OK to make mistakes, and making them is how we learn and grow as a person. That’s something useful for life in general, not just music.

2. They taught you to believe in your abilities and stay calm under pressure. Again, not bad qualities to have regardless of what you’re doing.

3. They encouraged you to do your best and push your limits.

4. They destroyed the “practice makes perfect” cliche. In reality, a copious amount of practice is not enough to become a great musician. You always need to find a way to make yourself inspired.

5. They show tremendous dedication, including by taking after school lessons, running school orchestras and clubs, and planning activities. A lot of this additional commitment is never recognized in a teacher’s working hours or salary.

6. They made mathematics easier to understand. After all, its simpler to grasp the concept of two quarter notes fitting in to a half than trying to stare at a badly drawn diagram on a blackboard.

7. They pushed you to take responsibility for your actions, by practicing for your weekly piano lessons or remembering to bring your violin to school.

8. They opened the doors to something which has been shown to stimulate the entire brain. As noted in a recent article, a vast quantity of scientific research has proven the positive effects of music in many areas.

9. They stressed the importance of always looking for ways to improve. Whether or not you’re still playing piano today, a healthy dose of self-criticism can only be a good thing.

Original article on CMUSE 4/21/2015